MythTiKalWay

locsgirl:

queenazherspitsfire:

therebirthofren:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know more Black History Facts. (Source)

If you don’t know…

Black excellence on 100

Philis Wheatley was a SLAVE though.  NOT a servant and there is a difference.  Let’s not falsify and sugarcoat the evil and brutal history of slavery, especially slavery of black people, as just a period of being servants.  Philis was a SLAVE.  Yes, her OWNERS taught her to read and write and treated her better than most other slaves were treated, but she was still paraded around like an exhibit and part of the reason she got so famous was because of the anomaly of a SLAVE being able to do what was ILLEGAL.

adorablelesbiancouples:

pride with my love :)
me on the left: http://liiiiiily.tumblr.com
her on the right: http://ergo-timebimus.tumblr.com

adorablelesbiancouples:

pride with my love :)

me on the left: http://liiiiiily.tumblr.com

her on the right: http://ergo-timebimus.tumblr.com

complexitii:

Ida Bell Wells (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931)

"Ida B. Wells began her crusade against the oppression of black people in 1884, when, at the age of sixteen, she sued the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad for evicting her from a first class car. A teacher and journalist, she began a one-woman anti-lynching campaign after a close friend was murdered. She traveled throughout England and later in the United States gaining support; got married; began the first clubs for black women in the US; started a reading room, shelter, and employment service for black men in Chicago; investigated race riots; and had six children."

- Erica Bauermeister’s review of Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells

Additional Reading: How Racism Tainted Women’s Fight to Vote 

complexitii:

Ida Bell Wells (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931)

"Ida B. Wells began her crusade against the oppression of black people in 1884, when, at the age of sixteen, she sued the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad for evicting her from a first class car. A teacher and journalist, she began a one-woman anti-lynching campaign after a close friend was murdered. She traveled throughout England and later in the United States gaining support; got married; began the first clubs for black women in the US; started a reading room, shelter, and employment service for black men in Chicago; investigated race riots; and had six children."

- Erica Bauermeister’s review of Crusade for Justice: The Autobiography of Ida B. Wells

Additional Reading: How Racism Tainted Women’s Fight to Vote 

(via deliciousbrownkisses)

getoutoftherecat:

because i do not own my bed.

getoutoftherecat:

because i do not own my bed.

(via freshest-tittymilk)

mocada-museum:

Portland State, “Black Studies Center public dialogue. Pt. 2,” May 30, 1975.Listen to the full audio of the panel.

mocada-museum:

Portland State, “Black Studies Center public dialogue. Pt. 2,” May 30, 1975.

Listen to the full audio of the panel.

(via divalocity)

everydayfixxx:

Jimmi: All Is By My Side (Official Trailer)

(Source: youtube.com, via freshest-tittymilk)

It’s official my Baby is a licensed driver!! Look out Cleveland streets… #teendriver #proudmom2014

It’s official my Baby is a licensed driver!! Look out Cleveland streets… #teendriver #proudmom2014

marfmellow:

gradientlair:

I created this Street Harassment and Street Harassment + Misogynoir BINGO card (latter particular to intraracial misogynoir and street harassment as experienced by Black women), cataloguing the most common excuses provided to justify this violence towards women. It’s been on my mind for a while as excuses said to me, some of which I wrote months ago in 10 Common Ignorant Replies Made To Women Who Discuss Experiencing Street Harassment, but also surfaced in response to some of the excuses being used to derail an upcoming anti-street harassment chat #YouOkSis (hosted by @Russian_Starr and @FeministaJones) scheduled for Thursday, July 10th at 12pm.

As you know and I’ve shared here, I’ve experienced this violence for almost 23 years now, and have written about street harassment for two years in detail in my Street Harassment Is Violence (Essay Compilation) with perspectives from a variety of angles including: what I experience most which is intraracial street harassment, street harassment from White male cops/White men who associate Black womanhood itself with sex work and violently so, experiencing PTSD because of street harassment, some Black people’s demands for silence and derailment on this topic because of fear of the White Gaze coupled with lack of compassion for and recognition of Black women’s humanity and call Black women speaking truth to power “divide and conquer,” how it is in fact violence about reclamation/affirmation of power and not “flirting,” the racist and anti-intersectional mainstream media framing and centering of White women as the only victims of street harassment with Black men as only perpetrators, and how that removes other men’s culpability and silences Black women experiences, and many more perspectives. 

Please join for the #YouOkSis chat if you can/able though be aware that racist, sexist, misogynoiristic men of a variety of backgrounds have planned to derail it and harm, however, as there are organized and disorganized campaigns to silence Black women online, in general. And while the focus is Black women— because margin needs to be centered versus silenced—understanding how women oppressed at multiple intersections and dehumanized via anti-Blackness and misogynoir actually facilitates the illumination of the understanding of those usually centered, and this facilitation doesn’t have to occur through erasure or co-opt via generalization. Margin to center is womanism. It is anti-Blackness and misogynoir (and often [trans]misogynoir as Black trans women face brutal street harassment and worse) to suggest Black women don’t deserve the space or time to analyze our experiences and value our own lives, to be clear. Specificity is not “oppression olympics” but is a matter of survival for Black women. 

The chat isn’t only for Black women either; Black men who KNOW that they are more than a violent portrayal of a White supremacist and anti-Black construction of masculinity (and reject performing masculinity as such) and want safer and healthier experiences for Black women and our communities are welcome to be there. In fact, one of the moderators is a Black man. And since non-cishet or non-cis or non-het or non-binary gender Black people also experience street harassment, of course all of these voices matter.

This violence and the excuses have to stop. The demand for Black women to be silent has to stop.

 BOOST!

(via stupiduglyfatcunt)